DevOps Culture Anti-pattern: Centralized Decision Making

“It is better to ask for forgiveness than permission.” A statement like that is pervasive in an organization that follows a decentralized command and control structure. As organizations become more complex, it is nearly impossible for any single person to fully capture detailed information in making decisions. Yet, many companies still try to run significant decision making authority through single threaded resources.

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DevOps Culture Anti-pattern: Silos

The technology industry has embraced the DevOps definition around the idea that it is used to break down silos and barriers to teams working together. As a portmanteau, the word DevOps clearly states in its own name the purpose of the philosophy. However, just smashing together a development and operations team does not just automatically eliminate silos within an organization.

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DevOps Culture Anti-pattern: Super Heroes

Personal responsibility and accountability are important traits team members should have in a collaborative work environment. But Super Heroes in the workplace take this mentality to the extreme end of the spectrum. As I review the issues within organizations trying to implement DevOps, this is the most difficult one to reign in. Because this mentality is not far off from an addiction to work, in which the offending resource feels the need and desire to worm themselves into a situation that needs them to save the day.

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DevOps Culture Anti-pattern: Tribal Knowledge

As I have been digging into the various cultural pitfalls that operations groups can fall into, tribal knowledge is the first one that teams can dig themselves out of. Imagine you are an executive or director that knows that the information you need for your company to succeed is stuck in the head of one of your employees, but you do not know whose mind or what that piece of information is. It is a puzzle or mystery that can only be solved by the organization as a whole.

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DevOps Culture Anti-patterns

DevOps has many different meanings depending on the perspective and experience of anyone you might ask. The tech industry generally aligns on DevOps being a set of practices and culture that an organization adheres to in order to deliver operational excellence. DevOps should not be a team, a set of tools, or something you can bring in a consultant to apply to your organization. Excellent leaders in the DevOps space realize that self-reflection and attempts to correct any issues are the most effective ways to improve.

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LAKC17 DevOps Journey with the Company Intranet

Thanks to the crew at Lean Agile KC for putting together an exceptional LAKC17 this year. I really enjoyed the interaction with everyone curious about operations practices at VML. It was a pleasure sharing how we fixed our DevOps Culture Anti-patterns by learning on our internal portal. And taking a bit of time to go over some additional learning and practices in an Open Sessions was awesome. Thanks to everyone who continued the discussion. See below for the SlideShare and my notes with some of the things I spoke about not directly in the slides.

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Lean Enterprise Kicks Into Gear

I have recently been talking about how various books have helped my career in some unique ways, from helping bring some day to day peace, to changing the way I think about working with other teams. One of the most intriguing books I have ever read that impacted not just myself, but my organization is Lean Enterprise: How High Performance Organizations Innovate at Scale (Lean (O’Reilly)). You can re-read my other posts about the influential books below:

Production Support turns to Site Reliability Engineering

This week I have talked about a couple of books that have impacted my work and career. Please go back and read the following posts about two that have shaped me into the engineer and manager that I am today:

The book that really gave a gut punch to my specific day to day capabilities was Site Reliability Engineering: How Google Runs Production Systems

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Good Financials at Home Help at Work

A common question here in the United States when meeting new people is “What do you do?” There’s a comfortable familiarity people in America have with asking what others jobs are as they are often very intertwined around our identities. In other parts of the world, like the UK or the Netherlands, asking what someone’s job is can be considered quite rude, and not a proper conversation starter to get to know someone. But here, we pour so much of our heart and soul into work and unfortunately tying that to status, our paycheck, and the stuff we can buy with it. But one book helped wrangle those ideals in an unexpected way which changed my outlook on what a job meant to me and my family.

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The Phoenix Project and Other World Changers

This week I am going over a few resources that I have run across that have shaped, changed, or completely rocked my career in technology. Today I want to start with the book that started my current career arc in a way that led to some of the best outcomes like working a sane number of hours per week, dealing with fewer panicky late night issues, and having an overall increase in career and personal wellness. I know that is a lot to put on just one book, but it was so impacting in a way that made me realize that I should not just keep doing my job the same way “because that’s the way we’ve always done it”.

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